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Eleanor McPhee

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Eleanor McPhee

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Examiner 1179
PhD, BMus (Hons), BMus

Eleanor McPhee received the Calloway Doctoral Award, which is presented biennially for the best doctoral thesis from an Australian university in the area of music education.

Dr McPhee has performed with a wide variety of ensembles. She plays clarinet, saxophone and oboe with The Moving Picture Show, a project that creates historical performances of silent films from the 1920s with a live orchestra and sound effects.

Currently, Dr McPhee is a lecturer in music skills and performance at the University of Wollongong and is completing her master of secondary teaching at Western Sydney University. She has taught various aspects of music skills and performance at the University of Wollongong, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and Western Sydney University. Recently, she was the National Education Content Manager for Musica Viva Australia, where she developed the new schools touring show for TaikOz.

Dr McPhee was a founding member of the HONK! Oz Festival, which brings free collaborative music making to Wollongong through workshops, individual and ensemble performances, street parades and improvised jam sessions. HONK! Oz aims to build a vibrant musical community and invites community members with little or no musical experience to perform alongside more experienced and professional musicians.

When not performing and teaching, Dr McPhee writes on the topics of instrumental pedagogy, performance pedagogy, the historical performance practices of the silent film era and, most recently, community music.